Travel

Arthurian legend is everywhere in Great Britain, with many historical sites being the supposed location to many mythical castles or stories, with Camelot being not exception. Many scholars now believe Camelot was made of in French Romantic poems, but this has not stopped rumors of its actual location. Occasionally I visit ‘nerdy’ places on accident. I either wander into them or find out their significance later on, as was the case with The Eagle and Child and the rabbit room. The same happened with my first run in with Camelot. It was my first day in Edinburgh for a long…

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I have been to Oxford twice. The first time I was your typical tourist roaming the university grounds, admiring the architecture, and visiting some of the free museums. The second time I was passing through on my way to and from Blenheim Palace (which I recommend). On the way back I decided to stay in Oxford for a bit before catching the train back to London. For whatever reason I decided to get dinner at The Eagle and Child, a pub on St. Giles. Previously I had viewed this pub as a ‘tourist trap.’ This is because The Eagle and…

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From England you can easily travel Europe. On the Eurostar train you can yourself in Paris in a little over two hours (from London). In my time there I did many things you can classify as ‘nerdy.’ I hung out with the Gargoyles at Notre Dame, wandered the Jardin de Luxemburg for the Statue of Liberty, walked the grand staircase of the Opera House, and like many marveled at the Hall of Mirrors in Versailles. Paris is a wonderful city, but quite frankly everyone goes to Paris. It is for this reason I travelled an hour and a half outside…

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With Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them opening this week, I thought this was good time to look back at one of the birthplaces of Harry Potter, The Elephant House. J.K. Rowling wrote the first two Harry Potter novels in various café’s in Edinburgh, Scotland, but The Elephant House is probably the best remembered and the most publicized. I came across it in a student travel book and decided to stop by early one morning for breakfast. Even in the morning a number of tourists were outside taking pictures in front of the café, especially the sign declaring it…

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“Remember, remember! The fifth of November, The Gunpowder treason and plot; I know of no reason Why the Gunpowder treason Should ever be forgot.” I first became aware of Guy Fawkes while reading Alan Moore’s V for Vendetta, probably how many people outside of Great Britain became familiar with him. Guy Fawkes was one of many conspirators who sought to blow up the Houses of Parliament and was arrested on November 5, 1605. In commemoration of foiling the plot Great Britain started celebrating Guy Fawkes Night or Bonfire Night. Earlier celebrations, and some current, involve burning effigies of disliked public figures. Though the years Bonfire…

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